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Open Access Journal

Korean Journal of Environmental Agriculture

p-ISSN 1225-3537
e-ISSN 2233-4173

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The Korean Journal of Environmental Agriculture is an official publication of the Korean Society of Environmental Agriculture. It is published quarterly a year, March 31, June 30, September 30, and December 31, and distributed to more than 700 members including individuals and institutions. The abbreviated title is ‘Korean J. Environ. Agric.’ The journal was launched on June 30 in 1982, the Print ISSN was issued on October 30, 1992 (Volume 11, No. 2) while the Online ISSN was issued on December 31, 2010 (Volume 29, No. 4). Whole document of a part of the articles in this journal are listed in the Google Scholar, Korea Citation Index (KCI) and ScienceCentral. The full text is freely available from http://www.korseaj.org.

Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License

This is an Open-Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Current Issue 2020. Vol.39, Iss.2more..

  • Residual Characteristics of Diethofencarb during Ginseng Cultivation and Processing
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    BACKGROUND:

    This study was carried out to investigate residual characteristics of diethofencarb during ginseng cultivation and processing, and to establish the maximum residue limits (MRL) of ginseng and its processed products.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    Supervised field trials were conducted from three fields located at Seosan, Goesan and Jeongeup in Korea. Diethofencarb 25% WP was diluted by 500 times and sprayed 4 times onto the ginseng with 10 days interval. The samples were collected at 80 days after final application. The residual amounts of diethofencarb ranged from 0.074 to 0.460 mg/kg in fresh ginseng, from 0.292 to 0.720 mg/kg in dried ginseng, and from 0.208 to 0.557 mg/kg in red ginseng. These data exceeded the ginseng’s MRL, 0.3 mg/kg. The processing factors of diethofencarb in processed products were found to be 2.64 and 1.99, respectively for dried and red ginseng.

    CONCLUSION:

    Given the lower residual concentration of red ginseng that goes through a more complicated process than dried ginseng, the residual concentrations of diethofencarb in processed ginseng products were found to be dependent on processing method. Therefore, it is necessary to reconsider the MRL of diethofencarb in fresh ginseng and its processed products

  • Assessment of Blood Meal Applicability for Removal of DDT from Agricultural Soil
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    BACKGROUND:

    Persistent organic contaminants such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) are often found in agricultural soils decades after it was banned in Korea. This study uses hemoglobin and hemoglobin-containing blood meal to reduce the residual DDT in soil.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    Hemoglobin or blood meal with or without hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was mixed with the DDT-spiked soil prepared for this study, and samples were taken over 14 d-degradation period to measure the residual DDT concentrations. With only hemoglobin, DDT was completely removed after 14 d, while with both hemoglobin and H2O2, 73%, on average, removal was observed. Similarly, the blood meal removed 73% of DDT, but with H2O2, the DDT removal was only 39%. The lower DDT removal in the presence of H2O2 can be attributed to the adverse effects of reactive species. Hemoglobin was more effective than blood meal for DDT removal in a given time; however, with additional blood meal injection, complete DDT removal was achieved

    CONCLUSION:

    Overall, this study shows that the blood meal that is used as a fertilizer can potentially be used to remove residual contaminants such as DDT in agricultural soil.

  • Influence of Fertilization Treatment using Organic Amendment based on Soil Testing on Plant Growth and Nutrient use Efficiency in Cabbage
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    BACKGROUND:

    In this study, in order to verify the effects of supplemented organic amendment fertilizers recommended by the soil testing on cabbages, we used various amounts of organic amendment fertilizers. The amount of organic amendment fertilizers was decided by calculating each ratio of inorganic nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium based on the recommended fertilizer composition.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    The cabbages subjected to treatments 1 and 2 showed similar or greater leaf colors (SPAD values), head heights, head widths, head weight, soil organic matter content, nitrate-nitrogen level, and conductivity after harvest, when compared with cabbages treated with chemical fertilizers. The phosphorus and potassium fixation in the soil were higher in the plot where cabbages were treated with chemical fertilizers, and the nutrient use efficiency was greater in the plots with organic amendments and mineral addition.

    CONCLUSION:

    The treatments 1 and 2 that were supplemented with 180-200% of nitrogen, 100-130% of phosphorus, and 185-250% of potassium in comparison to chemical fertilizers, applied by the inorganic ratios of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium can be used as organic amendment fertilizers for cabbages.

  • Assessment of Contact and Oral Toxicity of Four Neonicotinoid Insecticides to Bumblebees (Bombus terrestris)
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    BACKGROUND:

    Bumblebees have been shown to be very effective pollinators for most greenhouse tomatoes. Neonicotinoid insecticides are one of the most widely used pesticides in tomato crops in Korea.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    This study was carried out to investigate the toxicity of four neonicotinoid insecticides (clothianidin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam) to bumblebees based on the OECD guidelines (No.246, 247). The 48 hr LD50 (μg a.i. /bumblebee) values in the acute contact toxicity tests were determined as follows: clothianidin, 0.467; dinotefuran, 3.741; imidacloprid, 3.967; and thiamethoxam, 0.747. The 48 hr LD50 values in the acute oral toxicity tests were determined as follows: clothianidin, 0.005; dinotefuran, 0.056; imidacloprid, 0.325; and thiamethoxam, 0.018. The acute contact and oral toxicity of the test insecticides to bumblebees from most to least toxic was clothianidin > thiamethoxam > dinotefuran > imidacloprid.

    CONCLUSION:

    This study provided the basic toxicological data of neonicotinoid insecticides for bumblebees. In the near future, acute toxicity and mixture toxicity of other pesticides to bumblebees could be determined using this method.

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