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Open Access Journal

Korean Journal of Environmental Agriculture

p-ISSN 1225-3537
e-ISSN 2233-4173

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The Korean Journal of Environmental Agriculture is an official publication of the Korean Society of Environmental Agriculture. It is published quarterly a year, March 31, June 30, September 30, and December 31, and distributed to more than 700 members including individuals and institutions. The abbreviated title is ‘Korean J. Environ. Agric.’ The journal was launched on June 30 in 1982, the Print ISSN was issued on October 30, 1992 (Volume 11, No. 2) while the Online ISSN was issued on December 31, 2010 (Volume 29, No. 4). Whole document of a part of the articles in this journal are listed in the Google Scholar, Korea Citation Index (KCI) and ScienceCentral. The full text is freely available from http://www.korseaj.org.

Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License

This is an Open-Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Current Issue 2019. Vol.38, Iss.3more..

  • Relation of Organic Matter Content and Nitrogen Mineralization of Soils Collected from Pepper Cultivated Land
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    BACKGROUND:

    Estimation of soil nitrogen supply is essential to manage nitrogen fertilization in arable land. In Korea, nitrogen fertilization is recommended based on the soil organic matter content because it is difficult to assess nitrogen (N) mineralization of upland soils directly. In this study, the relationship between soil organic matter (SOM) content and N mineralization was investigated to explore the limitation of using SOM in predicting soil N mineralization.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    Soil samples from the 0 to 10 cm depth were collected from 18 individual pepper cultivated fields in Tae-an and Chung-yang provinces before fertilization. N mineralization in the soils was quantified using incubation for 70 days at 30℃. The mineralizable soil N (MSN) was positively correlated with SOM, and the relation equation between MSN and SOM was‘MSN(kg 10a-1) = 0.2933*SOM(g kg-1) + 0.0897 (r2=0.6224, p<0.001)’. However, the differences of N mineralization among the soils with the similar concentrations of soil organic matter were about 3 to 4.6 times, suggesting that the other soil factors such as total N concentration or EC should affect N mineralization.

    CONCLUSION:

    We concluded that SOM alone could not reflect the capacity of soil to supply N that is used for recommendation of N fertilization rate. Therefore, other soil properties should be considered to improve N fertilization management in arable land for sustainable agriculture.

  • Effects of Soil Improvement and Growth of Watermelon on Plastic Film House by Soil Treatment of Miscanthus sinensis
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    BACKGROUND:

    Silver grass (Miscanthus sinensis) No. 1 was developed for production of bio-ethanol, and for the purpose the silver grass growing sector was established in Geumgang basin, Iksan, Jeonbuk, in 2011. However, the other application potentials except for using as the bio-energy resources should be considered because of the drop in international oil prices. Therefore, there is the necessity of a scientific basis to use the silver grass instead of rice straw as the organic matter source that is used for improvement of soil quality in the plastic film house.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    The silver grass was applied at 5, 10, 15 and 20 Mg/ha and tilled before the watermelon was planted in the plastic film-house. The control plot was treated with 10 Mg/ha with rice straw, and watermelons have been cultivated for 3 years(2017~2019). Soil aggregation, soil chemistry, and the growth characteristics were investigated, when the watermelon was harvested every year. Soil aggregation levels at the 2nd and 3rd year of watermelon harvest were similar from the plot applied with the silver grass at 5 Mg/ha and the control plot, and increased in the silver grass treated plots with more than 10 Mg/ha. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the plots. The nitrogen mineralization of silver grass in the control plot tended to be similar to the 5 Mg/ha plot, but the silver grass treated plots with over 10 Mg/ha showed low nitrogen mineralization. Soil EC on harvest stage was proportional to the applied mass of the silver grass, but pH was in inverse with the applied mass. Soil organic matter content, available phosphate, and exchangeable cations increased with the continued use of silver grass. Watermelon weight found to be the best on more than 15 Mg/ha of silver grass, and the sugar content was highest when 10 Mg/ha was treated.

    CONCLUSION:

    The use of the silver grass at 10 Mg/ha annually as the organic source was effective in replacing rice straw while growing fruits and vegetables on the plastic film house.

  • Relationship Assessment on Amount of Irrigation Water & Productivity of Rice by Production Function
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    BACKGROUND:

    Production function gives the equation that shows the relationship between the quantities of productive factors used and the amount of product obtained, and can answer a variety of questions. This study was carried out to evaluate the relationship between irrigation water used for rice production and rice productivity by the production function which shows the mathematical relation between input and output.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    The statistical data on rice production and on the amount of irrigation water were used for the production function analysis. The analysis period was separated for 1966-1981 and 1982-2011, based on goal’s change on agriculture from 'increasing food' to 'complex farming'. The relation between irrigation and yield considering production function is a short-term production function both before and after 1982. These results can be expressed by the sigmoid relation. When comparing the graphs of the two analyzed periods, there are differences in quantity between the maximum point and the minimum point during the same analysis period, which can be called an ‘Irrigation Effect’ by the difference of irrigation, and ‘Technical Effect’ by the difference by inputs like as fertilizers etc.

    CONCLUSION:

    The results could be useful as information for assessing the relationship between agricultural water and the productivity of rice and predicting rice productivity by irrigation water in Korea.

  • Effect of Agricultural Land Use on Abundance, Community Structure and Biodiversity of Epigeic Arthropods
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    BACKGROUND:

    Epigeic arthropods participate in ecological functions as predators, decomposers and herbivores. The purpose of this study was to investigate the responses of some dominant arthropods in rice fields to different forms of agricultural land management.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    The abundance of microarthropods was compared between rice fields and uplands in the non-growing season. Collembola, Oribatida and Mesostigmata were more abundant in the upland fields than in the paddy fields. The community composition and diversity of epigeic arthropods were compared between fallow and rice fields. The total abundance and species richness of spiders and ground beetles were not significantly different in the two types of agricultural fields. The abundance of Arctosa kwangreungensis was greater in fallow fields than in cultivated fields. The community structure of arthropods was compared between paddy fields with and without barley. The cropping system altered the community composition of spiders but not their biodiversity. Barley cultivation increased the abundance of ground beetles but decreased that of spiders. We suggest that this contrast was partly due to the availability of plants that provided shelter and food for ground beetles.

    CONCLUSION:

    These results show that soil use intensity and cropping system alter the community composition of epigeic spiders and ground beetles. This could result in ecosystem-level alterations with respect to the control of pests and weeds. Our results also suggest that biodiversity of ground-dwelling arthropods may not increase during short fallow periods.

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