Menu
Open Access Journal

Korean Journal of Environmental Agriculture

p-ISSN 1225-3537
e-ISSN 2233-4173

About the Journalmore..

The Korean Journal of Environmental Agriculture is an official publication of the Korean Society of Environmental Agriculture. It is published quarterly a year, March 31, June 30, September 30, and December 31, and distributed to more than 700 members including individuals and institutions. The abbreviated title is ‘Korean J. Environ. Agric.’ The journal was launched on June 30 in 1982, the Print ISSN was issued on October 30, 1992 (Volume 11, No. 2) while the Online ISSN was issued on December 31, 2010 (Volume 29, No. 4). Whole document of a part of the articles in this journal are listed in the Google Scholar, Korea Citation Index (KCI) and ScienceCentral. The full text is freely available from http://www.korseaj.org.

Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License

This is an Open-Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Current Issue 2020. Vol.39, Iss.1more..

  • The Study of Soil Chemical Properties and Soil Bacterial Communities on the Cultivation Systems of Cnidium officinale Makino
    Abstract Full-Text PDF

    Abstract

    Close

    BACKGROUND:

    The aim of this study was to investigate the soil chemical properties and soil bacterial community of the cropping system for Cnidium officinale Makino.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    The bacterial community was analyzed for the relative abundance and principal coordinated analysis (PCoA analysis) by using by Illumina Miseq sequencing. The correlation analysis between soil chemical properties and soil bacterial community were analyzed by Spearman’s rank correlation and DISTLM analysis. Soil bacterial community (phylum and class) showed two distinct clusters consisting of cluster 1 (first cropping) and cluster 2 (continuous cropping) from 2 different cultivation methods of Cnidium officinale Makino. PCoA and DISTLM analyses showed that soil pH and Ca significantly affected soil bacterial community in cultivation area of Cnidium officinale Makino. In addition, Spearman’s rank correlation showed significant correlation between relative abundance (Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria) and soil factors (soil pH and Ca).

    CONCLUSION:

    The results of this study were considered to be important for determining the correlation between soil properties and soil bacterial community of the cropping method for Cnidium officinale Makino. Furthermore, the results will be helpful to investigate the cause of continuous cropping injury of the Cnidium officinale Makino by examining the changes of soil properties and soil bacterial communities.

  • Risk Assessment about Heavy Metals Contamination in Agricultural Products at Abandoned Mine Area
    Abstract Full-Text PDF

    Abstract

    Close

    BACKGROUND:

    This study was to carry out risk assessment of contamination of cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and inorganic arsenic (I-As) in agricultural products of 25 crops from the abandoned mine areas. The 36 typical investigation sites located in Gyeongbuk provincial area were selected by considering the heavy metal levels, that had been known that the amount of the heavy metals exceeded the contamination level based on the previous survey.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    Cadmium, lead, and total arsenic (T-As) concentrations were determined using microwave device and ICP-MS. Inorganic arsenic was determined by HPLC-ICP-MS. The limits of quantification for heavy metals were 0.59 μg/kg for Cd, 0.42 μg/kg for Pb, 0.55 μg/kg for T-As, and sum of As (Ⅲ) (1.74 μg/kg) and As (Ⅴ) (2.25 μg/kg) for I-As, respectively. The contents of Cd, Pb, and I-As (only rice) were N.D.-0.958 mg/kg, N.D.-0.227 mg/kg, and 0.082 mg/kg, respectively, in the agricultural products. For risk assessment, dietary exposures of heavy metals through usual intake were 5.20×10-4-7.15×100 μg/day for Cd, 7.00×10-5-7.75×10-1 μg/day for Pb, and 1.17×101 μg/day for I-As, taking 0.01-14.37%, 0.01-2.05%, and 15.16% as risk indices, respectively.

    CONCLUSION:

    It requires to consider the critical levels of heavy metals in agricultural products due to unexpectedly high levels in a few places, while concentrations of heavy metals in the samples were relatively low in most areas.

  • Melon Growth Enhancement by Fucoidan and Fucoidan Decomposing Bacteria
    Abstract Full-Text PDF

    Abstract

    Close

    BACKGROUND:

    Marine algae is a productive organism that is consumed as a nutritious food. However, large amounts of unused portions of the algae are incinerated as trash or dumped in the sea, causing pollution. Recycling algae is important for saving resources and conserving the environment. In this study, the fucoidan which is a major carbohydrate of marine algae was tested as a source of fertilizer for farming.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    The growth rate of the melon was examined after treating fucoidan and the melon growth factors, weight and length of stem were measured. To discover the mechanism of melon growth promotion of fucoidan, bacteria that decomposed fucoidan were isolated from soil and abalone. Bacillus wiedmannii and Stenotrophomonas pavanii were isolated from terrestrial soil and Pseudomonas sp. was isolated from abalone. Among these three bacteria, Pseudomonas sp. had the highest and most specific fucoidan-decomposing activity. When Pseudomonas sp. was treated with fucoidan on melon-growing soil, the growth of melon was relatively improved compared to the treatment with fucoidan alone.

    CONCLUSION:

    We found that fucoidan, the main carbohydrate of marine algae, promoted melon growth. Fucoidan-decomposing microorganisms were isolated from terrestrial soil and marine organism, and we found that these bacteria stimulated the effect of melon growth promotion of marine algae. This is the first report that confirms the fertilizer effect of marine algae and shows the use of bacteria with marine algae.

  • Detection and Potential Abundances of Anammox Bacteria in the Paddy Soil
    Abstract Full-Text PDF

    Abstract

    Close

    BACKGROUND:

    Microbes that govern a unique biochemical process of oxidizing ammonia into dinitrogen gas, such as anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) have been reported to play a pivotal role in agricultural soils and in oceanic environments. However, limited information for anammox bacterial abundance and distribution in the terrestrial habitats has been known.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    Phylogenetic and nextgeneration sequencing analyses of bacterial 16S rRNA gene were performed to examine potential anammox bacteria in paddy soils. Through clone libraries constructed by using the anammox bacteria-specific primers, some clones showed sequence similarities with Planctomycetes (87% to 99%) and anammox bacteria (94% to 95%). Microbial community analysis for the paddy soils by using Illumina Miseq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene at phylum level was dominated by unclassified Bacteria at 33.2 ± 7.6%, followed by Chloroflexi at 20.4 ± 2.0% and Acidobacteria at 17.0 ± 6.5%. Planctomycetes that anammox bacteria are belonged to was 1.5% (± 0.3) on average from the two paddy soils.

    CONCLUSION:

    We suggest evidence of anammox bacteria in the paddy soil. In addition to the relatively well-known microbial processes for nitrogen-cycle, anammox can be a potential contributor on the cycle in terrestrial environments such as paddy soils.

Most Viewmore..

Most Downloadmore..