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Open Access Journal

Korean Journal of Environmental Agriculture

p-ISSN 1225-3537
e-ISSN 2233-4173

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The Korean Journal of Environmental Agriculture is an official publication of the Korean Society of Environmental Agriculture. It is published quarterly a year, March 31, June 30, September 30, and December 31, and distributed to more than 700 members including individuals and institutions. The abbreviated title is ‘Korean J. Environ. Agric.’ The journal was launched on June 30 in 1982, the Print ISSN was issued on October 30, 1992 (Volume 11, No. 2) while the Online ISSN was issued on December 31, 2010 (Volume 29, No. 4). Whole document of a part of the articles in this journal are listed in the Google Scholar, Korea Citation Index (KCI) and ScienceCentral. The full text is freely available from http://www.korseaj.org.

Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License

This is an Open-Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Current Issue 2019. Vol.38, Iss.1more..

  • Study for Residue Analysis of Fluxametamid in Agricultural Commodities
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    BACKGROUND:

    Accurate and simple analytical method determining Fluxametamid residue was necessary in various food matrices. Additionally, fulfilment of the international guideline of Codex (Codex Alimentarius Commission CAC/GL 40) was required for the analytical method. In this study, we developed Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to determine the Fluxametamid residue in foods.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    Fluxametamid was extracted with acetonitrile, partitioned and concentrated with dichloromethane. To remove the interferences, silica SPE cartridge was used before LC-MS/MS (Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry) analysis with C18 column. Five agricultural commodities (mandarin, potato, soybean, hulled rice, and red pepper) were used as a group representative to verify the method. The liner matrix-matched calibration curves were confirmed with coefficient of determination (r2) greater than 0.99 at calibration range of 0.001-0.25 mg/kg. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.001 and 0.005 mg/kg, respectively. Mean average accuracies were shown to be 82.24-115.27%. The precision was also shown to be less than 10% for all five samples.

    CONCLUSION:

    The method investigated in this study was suitable to the Codex guideline for the residue analysis. Thus, this method can be useful for determining the residue in various food matrices as routine analysis.

  • Feasibility of Coal Combustion Ash on Acidity Regulation for Agricultural Use
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    BACKGROUND:

    Coal ashes generated from thermal power plants have been known as beneficial materials for agricultural use because of their nutrient elements. However, there is limitation to recycle them due to their alkalinity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness or safety of the coal ashes for their heavy metals on agricultural recycling when adjusted to pH of 5 with sulfuric acid.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    Concentration of hydrogen which is needed to adjust pH of coal ash was estimated by using a buffering curve and then the amount of sulfuric acid was changed by the estimation before incubation. Each of fly ash (FA) and bottom ash (BA) was collected from both thermal plants of Yeongdong (YD) and Yeongheung (YH). The pH values of coal ashes increased to 4.76 (from 4.34) after incubation with sulfuric acid for 56 days, closer to the targeted pH. Coal ashes also increased the contents of available phosphorus by 2-fold (165 mg/kg) and 11-fold (1,137 mg/kg) for YDBA and YDFA, respectively, compared to the control.

    CONCLUSION:

    The utilization of coal ash with its acidity regulation would be very beneficial to agriculture sector and further suggest promising environmental safety against heavy metals.

  • Stabilization of Arsenic in Paddy Soils Using Stabilizers
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    BACKGROUND:

    Soil contamination of As is a very sensitive environmental issue due to its adverse impact on human health and different characteristics with other heavy metals. With public awareness of As poisoning, there has been growing interest in developing guideline and remediation technologies for As-contaminated soil. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of stabilizing amendments and soil dressing methods on the mobility of As in the contaminated rice paddy soils nearby mining area.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    Different amendments were mixed with surface and subsurface contaminated soils at a ratio of 3% (w/w) and monitored for five months. Three different extractants including 0.01M CaCl2, TCLP, and PBET were used to examine As bioavailability in the soil and the concentration of As in rice grain was also measured with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectroscopy. The results showed that all amendment treatments decreased As concentration compared to the control. Especially, coal mine drainage sludge (CMDS) treatment showed the highest efficiency of decreasing As concentration in the soil and rice grain. The values of Pearson correlation (r) between As concentrations in the soil and rice grain were 0.782, 0.753, and 0.678 for CaCl2, TCLP, and PBET methods, respectively. Especially, CaCl2 method was highly correlated between As concentrations of the soil and soil solution (r=0.719), followed by TCLP (r=0.706), PBET (r=0.561) methods.

    CONCLUSION:

    Stabilizing amendments can effectively reduce available As concentration in the soils as well as soil solution, and thereby potentially mitigating risks of crop contamination by As.

  • The Environmental Adaptability of Pomacea canaliculata used for Weed Control in Wet Rice Paddies and Crop Damage Caused by Overwintered Golden Apple Snails
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    BACKGROUND:

    The golden apple snail(GAS, Pomacea canaliculata Lamarck) is an invasive freshwater snail. It has occurred 34 years since the introduction of the GAS to the Korea. The GASs have been used recently for weed control in wet rice cultivation. The GASs’adaptability to the environment of GAS has been improved and the GASs devour the young stage of the crops as well as weeds.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    We surveyed the survival area of the snails throughout the country during the winter seasons from 2000 to 2017 and crop damage due to GASs in 2017. Local maximum, minimum, and average air temperatures were monitored daily. The surveyed regions for the survival of the GASs in winters were Gangjin, Goheung, Shinan, Haenam, Gimhae, Haman, Busan, Jeju, and Seogwipo. The survival durations at low temperatures were 12 hours at -5℃, 1 day at -3℃, 2 days at -1℃, 10 days at 0℃, and over 30 days at 3℃. The eggs of GASs were not able to overwinter. The overwintering condition of the GAS needed a water depth of 10-20 cm with well formed mud. Crop damages caused by the overwintering GASs occurred in rice and water dropwort.

    CONCLUSION:

    The overwintering GAS was first identified in Haenam, South Korea 2000 after introduction of the GAS. The overwintering area of GAS expanded to the mid-southern parts of Korea. We propose that it has not yet become a pest to rice or any other crop.

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