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Open Access Journal

Korean Journal of Environmental Agriculture

p-ISSN 1225-3537
e-ISSN 2233-4173

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The Korean Journal of Environmental Agriculture is an official publication of the Korean Society of Environmental Agriculture. It is published quarterly a year, March 31, June 30, September 30, and December 31, and distributed to more than 700 members including individuals and institutions. The abbreviated title is ‘Korean J. Environ. Agric.’ The journal was launched on June 30 in 1982, the Print ISSN was issued on October 30, 1992 (Volume 11, No. 2) while the Online ISSN was issued on December 31, 2010 (Volume 29, No. 4). Whole document of a part of the articles in this journal are listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ, http://www.doaj.org), Google Scholar and Korea Citation Index (KCI). The full text is freely available from http://www.korseaj.org.

Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License

This is an Open-Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Current Issue 2016. Vol.35, Iss.2more..

  • A Research of Soil Environmental Health in Urban Garden, Gwangju
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    BACKGROUND:

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the soil quality to cultivate crops in urban garden.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    During the period of six month from March to August 2015, measured eight heavy metals, seven Organic items and Fluorine on seventeen urban sites and thirty-one suburban sites in Gwangju city.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    The average concentration and range of heavy metal in soil are 0.15 mg/kg(ND-0.6) for Cd, 14.9 mg/kg(1.5-33.3) for Cu, 4.4 mg/kg(0.4-71.8) for As, 0.05 mg/kg(ND-1.366) for Hg, 24.7 mg/kg(13.1-62.7) for Pb, 102.5 mg/kg(49.1-276.4) for Zn and 9.2 mg/kg(ND-90.1) for Ni but Cr6+ is not detected. The average value and range of soil fertility items are 253.5mg/kg(76.6-1766.0) for fluorine, 6.4(4.8-7.7) for pH, 20.3 g/kg(5.0-44.0) for orangic matters, 562.7 mg/kg (28.0-1672.0) for available phosphate, 0.6 cmol+/kg (0.1-2.3) for K, 9.7 cmol+/kg (2.7-22.0) for Ca, 3.0 cmol+/kg (0.9-7.4) for Mg, 1.0 ds/m(0.2-2.9) for conductivity. The concentration of Hg in Suburban area is 0.005 mg/kg lower than 0.134 mg/kg in urban area. Also, the concentration of As, Cd, Ni and Zn is lower than urban area as 32%, 37%, 51%, 71% respectively.

    CONCLUSION:

    According to SPI index of soil contamination, 39 sites are first degree and 8 sites are second degree and 1 site(41th) is fourth degree. Pb and Cd are not detected and As is detected tiny amounts in plants grown polluted soil, so heavy metals have not moved to plants.

  • Effect of Phyllite Application on Physical and Chemical Properties of Soil, Growth and Inorganic Nutrient Uptake of Crops
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    BACKGROUND:

    Clay mineral is well known to improve physico-chemical of soil. The objective of this study was to investigate the growth characteristics and inorganic nutrient contents of crops with application levels of phyllite.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    Both young radish and lettuce were selected as target crops for this study. The experiment was conducted in a wagner pot(1/5000a) in glass house at Sunchon National University. Treatment conditions were divided P0NPK(No phyllite + NPK), P5NPK(phyllite 5 Mg/ha + NPK), P10NPK(phyllite 10 Mg/ha + NPK) and P15NPK(phyllite 15 Mg/ha + NPK) by crops, respectively. Bulk density and porosity of soil in control without treatment conditions were ranged from 1.02 ∼1.04 g/cm3 and 56.5∼57.0%, respectively, and those for treatments with phyllite were in the ranged from 0.94∼1.00 g/cm3 and 58.4∼63.5%, respectively. Dry weights of young radish and lettuce were higher in P15NPK treatment than those in other treatments. The amounts of T-N, T-P and K uptake in young radish with phyllite application treatments were increased 36∼115, 18∼67 and 20∼76% than without phyllite application treatment, respectively. In lettuce treatments, amounts of T-N, T-P and K uptake were intended to all tested treatments similar with result of young radish treatment.

    CONCLUSION:

    Therefore, these results confirm that phyllite application to the soil improves physico-chemical of soil in addition to improving growth of young radish and lettuce.

  • Free Amino Acid Composition of Korean Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) Cultivars as Influenced by Different Harvesting Time
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    BACKGROUND:

    There is lack of comprehensive compositional data of the amino acid profile of spinach with regard to different cultivars. A more detailed knowledge in this aspect will be of benefit in the future selection of spinach genotypes with improved nutritional quality.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    The effects of cultivar type (Jeoncheonhu, Sagyejul, Namdongcho and Mustang) and harvest time (79th, 116th and 145th days after sowing or DAS) on the concentrations of free amino acids in field-grown spinach (Spinacia oleracea) were examined. About 35 different free amino acids were detected and quantified by the amino acid analyzer. Glutamic acid and proline were identified as the major amino acids, while α -aminoadipic acid and α-aminobutyric acid were present in much lower concentrations. Spinach constituted 1468.4 mg/100 g total free amino acids (TAA), of which essential amino acids, neutral/acidic amino acids and sulphur containing amino acids constituted around 15, 45 and 2% of the TAA, respectively. The most limiting amino acids among the leafy vegetables – cysteine was recorded only in Mustang harvested at 116 DAS. Free amino acid contents did not differ significantly among the spinach cultivars and also at different harvest times.

    CONCLUSION:

    The data show that, either of the spinach cultivars, preferably Mustang harvested on or after 116 DAS can serve as a significant source of nutritionally relevant amino acids to meet the demand of the growing populations.

  • Phytoremediation Potential of Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), Mesta (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.), and Jute (Corchorus capsularis L.) in Arsenic-contaminated Soil
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    BACKGROUND:

    Arsenic (As)-contaminated groundwater used for long-term irrigation has emerged as a serious problem by adding As to soils. Phytoremediation potential of fiber crops viz., kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), mesta (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.), and jute (Corchorus capsularis L.) was studied to clean up As-contaminated soil.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    Varieties of three fiber crops were selected in this study. Seeds of kenaf, mesta, and jute varieties were germinated in As-contaminated soil. Uptake of As by shoot was significantly higher than that by root in the contaminated soil. In As-contaminated soil, kenaf and mesta varieties accumulated more As, than did jute varieties. In the plant parts above ground, mainly the shoots, the highest As absorption was recorded in kenaf cv. HC-3, followed by kenaf cv. HC-95. Kenaf varieties produced more biomass. In terms of higher plant biomass production, and As absorption, kenaf varieties showed considerable potential to remediate As-contaminated soil.

    CONCLUSION:

    The overall As absorption and phytoremediation potentiality of plant varieties were in the order of kenaf cv. HC-3 > kenaf cv. HC-95 > mesta cv. Samu-93 > jute cv. CVE-3 > jute cv. BJC-7370. All varieties of kenaf, mesta, and jute could be considered for an appropriate green plant-based remediation technology in As-contaminated soil.

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